Hay in Art Database: Search Results

Your search returned 6780 matches.
Pages: [<<] ... 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 ... [>>]

Image: Hayfield
ID:  381
Artist:  Bough, Samuel
Artist Birth Date:  1822
Artist Death Date:  1878
Artist Country: British
Title of Work:  Hayfield
Date of Work:  1859
Medium:  oil
Period/Style:  nineteenth century
URL:  http://www.hayinart.com/images/381.jpg
Citation:  Country Life v162 (December 1 1977) p supp 48r
Index Words:  haycart, wagon, hayfield, workers, storm
Place:  England
Notes:  The indistinct magazine reproduction shows a hayfield under threatening crowds but only hints at the activity of the ten or so workers. In the foreground are thick, untidy windrows. Centrally against the sky is a loaded wagon.
Essays:  

Image: Haymaker's lunch
ID:  382
Artist:  Brooke, Edward
Artist Birth Date:  1846
Artist Death Date:  1878
Artist Country: British
Title of Work:  Haymaker's lunch
Date of Work:  
Medium:  oil
Period/Style:  nineteenth century
URL:  http://www.artpictures.co.uk/gijh1026.htm
Citation:  
Index Words:  haycart, hayfield, windrows, horses, rest, storm
Place:  England
Notes:  A man sits on a windrow eating lunch with a woman standing close by. Behind her is a chestnut horse with a white horse in tandem behind it, hitched to a two-wheeled empty cart. The thick, tidy windrows under a bright but apparently fleeting sun is well done. In th e background is a wdie river or inlet under a threatening sky.
Essays:  John Clare poems on hay.

Image: Trees with haystacks
ID:  383
Artist:  Bodichon, Barbara
Artist Birth Date:  1827
Artist Death Date:  1891
Artist Country: British
Title of Work:  Trees with haystacks
Date of Work:  1850
Medium:  watercolor
Period/Style:  nineteenth century
URL:  http://www.hayinart.com/images/384.jpg
Citation:  Apollo ns113 (May 1981) p.312
Index Words:  haystacks
Place:  England
Notes:  Trees and woods of all sorts for ever attracted [Bodichon]' (one of the founders of the British women's rights movement) and they are the dominant elements in this watercolor which also, to the right includes two haystacks.
Essays:  

Image: Hayfield
ID:  384
Artist:  Brown, Ford Madox
Artist Birth Date:  1821
Artist Death Date:  1893
Artist Country: British
Title of Work:  Hayfield
Date of Work:  1855
Medium:  oil
Period/Style:  nineteenth century
URL:  http://community.webshots.com/photo/3080229/3086049ULXsYWBzEY
Citation:  Payne, Christiana. Toil and plenty; images of agricultural landscape in England, 1780-1890.Yale UP, 1993, p.110-111, plate 16 [color]. Rosenthal, Michael. Britsh landscape painting. Oxford: Phaidon, 1982, p. 139.
Index Words:  hayfield, haycart, haycocks, windrow, workers, rest, children, moon
Place:  England
Notes:  ^^^ The Tate Gallery commentary on Brown's picture is excellent: 'In keeping with the Pre-Raphaelite aesthetic of 'truth to nature', much of this landscape was painted entirely on the spot. It offers a twilight view, looking east across rolling green fields on the Tenterden estate at Hendon in Middlesex. To the left of the picture, a farmer on horseback addresses the haymakers, who have almost completed the day's work. Another farm worker tends the horses, while a group of children await a lift home in the haycart. In the left foreground the artist himself rests against a small haystack, his equipment scattered about him. A full moon has just risen, and the setting sun strikes a distant house on its west side. Brown's aim in this picture was to achieve the effect of evening light, 'the wonderful effects...in the hayfields, the warmth of the uncut grass, the greeny greyness of the unmade hay in furrows or tufts' (Surtees, p.145). To this end, he began work at 5pm each evening, returning to the same spot about twice a week from the end of July until early September 1855. In October, after moving from Finchley to Kentish Town, he returned on several more occasions, and was sometimes forced to walk the fourteen miles there and back. During the winter months Brown worked in the foreground details. He sketched a haycart at Cumberland market. He then painted in the artist and his props, working from a set in his conservatory, but he apparently used no models for the farmer, workmen and children. Many of these later features lack the freshness of the landscape setting. The picture attracted criticism because of its unusual palette. In his 1865 catalogue Brown explained that 'the stacking of the second crop of hay had been much delayed by rain, which heightened the green of the remaining grass, together with the brown of the hay. The consequence was an effect of unusual beauty of colour, making the hay by contrast with the green grass, positively red or pink, under the glow of twilight' (quoted in Parris, p.134). Brown's dealer, White, refused to buy the picture, claiming that the hay was too pink. Brown retouched the picture and later sold it to his friend and fellow artist, William Morris (1834-96), for 40 guineas.' [Frances Fowle, December, 2000] Payne 's analysis is equally thoughtful. She notes that 'a sequence of events that would not have pleased an agriculturist (for the hay must have been spoiled by being left out in the rain), has produced an unusual and poetic effect.' (p.111) She evocatively compares the intense chromatic contrasts to stained glass.
Essays:  Hay poets born in the early nineteenth century.

Image: Haymaking
ID:  385
Artist:  Hicks, George Elgar
Artist Birth Date:  1824
Artist Death Date:  1914
Artist Country: British
Title of Work:  Haymaking
Date of Work:  1855
Medium:  oil
Period/Style:  nineteenth century
URL:  http://www.bridgemanartondemand.com/index.cfm?event=catalogue.product&productID=98808
Citation:  Connoisseur v204 (May 1980) p front 7 [color].
Index Words:  hayfield, workers, women
Place:  England
Notes:  Under a cloud-dappled blue sky which dominates the composition, several women are working in a hayfield. The principle figure, standing left of center, in bright white headscarf and blue dress , is the apex of a triangle of women. The one at lower right of the triangle is in shadow from which her bare arms emerge to bundle hay. Other background figures, mostly female, do indecipherable tasks . The Bridgeman title for this work is Gleaning, a more plausible interpretation.
Essays:  

Image: Haymaker raking
ID:  386
Artist:  Hicks, George Elgar
Artist Birth Date:  1824
Artist Death Date:  1914
Artist Country: British
Title of Work:  Haymaker raking
Date of Work:  1863
Medium:  oil
Period/Style:  nineteenth century
URL:  http://www.christies.com/promos/nov02/6645/promo_gallery.asp
Citation:  
Index Words:  rake, woman
Place:  England
Notes:  The composition is dominated by a woman wearing a pink, ruffled bonnet and raking hay. She is so close to the observer that only the handle of the rake is visible. To her right in the background can be glimpsed a windrow leading to a group of workers tying off a wagonload or stack. Under the shadow of her bonnet she is pink-faced but serenely smiling.
Essays:  Roles in the hay (work), Hay poets born in the early nineteenth century.

Image: Preparing to load hay ricks
ID:  387
Artist:  Woollett, H C
Artist Birth Date:  
Artist Death Date:  
Artist Country: British
Title of Work:  Preparing to load hay ricks
Date of Work:  1855
Medium:  oil
Period/Style:  nineteenth century
URL:  http://www.hayinart.com/images/387.jpg
Citation:  Country Life v154 (November 15 1973) p supp 78.
Index Words:  harvest, stooks, mistakes
Place:  England
Notes:  Even in the poor magazine reproduction, the 'hay ricks' to be loaded are obviously stooks.
Essays:  

Image: Harvest
ID:  388
Artist:  Herring, John Frederick , Sr.
Artist Birth Date:  1795
Artist Death Date:  1865
Artist Country: British
Title of Work:  Harvest
Date of Work:  1857
Medium:  oil
Period/Style:  nineteenth century
URL:  http://www.hayinart.com/images/388.jpg
Citation:  Payne, Christiana. Toil and plenty; images of agricultural landscape in England, 1780-1890.Yale UP, 1993, p.159.
Index Words:  harvest, wagon, horses
Place:  England
Notes:  A wagon, heavily loaded, is pulled by three horses (in a line) up a steep hill. The burden is probably sheaves (there are stooks in the background field), and the shape of the load is too square and tidy to be hay, but the crowded foreground (six figures and a dog) and the rolling background are models of the British mid-century landscape genre painting.
Essays:  

Image: Hayfield
ID:  389
Artist:  Linnell, John
Artist Birth Date:  1792
Artist Death Date:  1882
Artist Country: British
Title of Work:  Hayfield
Date of Work:  1864
Medium:  oil
Period/Style:  nineteenth century
URL:  http://www.hayinart.com/images/389.jpg
Citation:  Apollo ns78 (November 1963) p. xxxiv.
Index Words:  hayfield, workers, resting
Place:  England
Notes:  The magazine reproduction is obscure but shows in the foreground half-a-dozen workers seated or lying, evidently taking their lunch break.
Essays:  

Image: Mowers in the field in Porchester Terrace, Bayswater
ID:  390
Artist:  Linnell, John
Artist Birth Date:  1792
Artist Death Date:  1882
Artist Country: British
Title of Work:  Mowers in the field in Porchester Terrace, Bayswater
Date of Work:  1830
Medium:  watercolor
Period/Style:  nineteenth century
URL:  http://www.hayinart.com/images/390.jpg
Citation:  Payne, Christiana. Toil and plenty; images of agricultural landscape in England, 1780-1890.Yale UP, 1993, p.159.
Index Words:  hayfield, workers, resting
Place:  England
Notes:  When this sketch was made, the field was at the edge of the London suburb of Bayswater. The positions and dress of the seated figures are very close to those shown in Linnell's 1864 painting (ID 389). Payne notes the absence of women from the sketch, and surmises that the work is at the early mowing phase; the women would come later to turn it with rakes and forks.
Essays:  

Pages: [<<] ... 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 ... [>>]

| Home | View | List All | Log Off |

Database Powered by Gossamer Threads Inc. Database Powered by Gossamer Threads Inc.